Club forms to examine the X-rated

The club will discuss adult films’ intellectual and cultural significance.

Lily Langerud

Alex Wade wanted to start what he thought would be the “best free speech club ever.”

After a semester of dragging his feet and occasionally filling out paperwork, Wade, president of the Adult Film Appreciation Club, screened “Camp Cuddly Pines Power Tool Massacre” on Thursday in Coffman Union.

Clearing up any misconceptions about what exactly takes place at group meetings, Wade said the group has “a very strict no masturbation policy.”

“We’re about hard-core discussion, not hard-core self-love,” Wade said.

The group will discuss the films during the screenings, asking questions and offering commentary to determine the intellectual and cultural significance of the films, he said.

“It’s going to be more ‘Beavis and Butthead’ than ‘Mystery Science Theater,’ ” he said, referring to the mood of the discussions.

He said the group will discuss important questions like whether performing sex doggy style demeans women.

Heidi Kitrosser, a Law School professor, said certain types of speech, such as pornography, often are topics for potential banning.

“Oftentimes, embracing that same speech becomes synonymous with embracing the First Amendment,” she said. “I think this is definitely a very common phenomenon.”

Marvin Marshak, a physics professor, said Wade – a student of his – asked him to be the faculty liaison for the group.

“I’m never surprised by what students do,” Marshak said.

He supports the Constitution, but has no particular interest in constitutional law, he said.

“I think it’s important for all citizens to take an active part in a democracy,” he added.

Wade said he didn’t expect the University to oppose the club, but he did expect it to get tied up in bureaucracy.

“The campus is pretty liberal, and I knew that the campus would have to be down (with the club) for it to not look hypocritical,” he said.

Dan Ojalvo, group vice president and first-year student, said the group is trying to remove “weird feelings” about adult films.

The group registered with the Student Activities Office in April.

“I have to give props to the Student Activities Office because they’re a pretty cool group,” Ojalvo said.

After filling out the necessary paperwork to register the group, the University required Wade to get distribution rights to screen the films – as it would for any other student group.

Wade got a temporary license from Wicked Pictures to show Thursday’s film, and said he hopes to get a more permanent license so the group can meet over the summer.

The group will continue meeting next semester, he said. Those interested in joining can contact Wade via e-mail at [email protected]