Daily Digest: Gingrich to drop out, immigration law goes to court, bombings continue in South Sudan, slow jams

John Hageman

Here's your Daily Digest for Wednesday, April 25:

-After Mitt Romney swept five Republican primaries Tuesday night, it appears Newt Gingrich is preparing to step aside.

The Associated Press reports Gingrich will end his campaign next Tuesday and endorse Romney, although he has not formally made that announcement.

Gringrich told a group of supporters Wednesday that "You have to at some point be honest about what's happening in the real world as opposed to what you would like to have happened.”

"Gov. Romney had a very good day yesterday. You have to give him some credit. He's worked for six years. He put together a big machine … I think I would obviously be a better candidate."

Gingrich said he would begin helping unite the party behind Romney. He said he was now campaigning as a “citizen,” although it’s not clear what that means.

Romney has been considered the uncontested favorite to win the Republican nomination since Rick Santorum dropped out of the race April 10.

 

–The U.S. Supreme Court is hearing arguments in Arizona’s contentious immigration law Wednesday, according to the Associated Press.

A provision in that law allows police officers, while enforcing other laws, to question a person’s immigration status if they believe them to be here illegally.

Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer signed the bill into law about two years ago, stirring protests nationwide. The Obama administration challenged the law in federal court.

Similar laws were passed in Alabama, Georgia, Indiana, South Carolina and Utah, but are pending the Supreme Court’s decision.

A decision is expected in June.

 

–South Sudan says Sudan has continued aerial bombardments, which it considers a declaration of war, according to the New York Times.

South Sudanese president, Salva Kiir, met with President Hu Jintao of China, a crucial friend to both nations, Tuesday to tell him that Sudan had declared war.

Warplanes from Sudan bombed the border between the two countries late Monday into Tuesday, according to a government official.

The violence stems from South Sudan’s taking of the oil-rich Heglig region last month. Sudan took back the area last week.

Sudan denies that it has bombed the South, however.

A 2005 peace agreement that followed decades of civil war allowed South Sudan to become independent, and the world’s newest country.

 

–President Barack Obama appeared on the Late Night with Jimmy Fallon Tuesday, as part of his push to get Congress to act on Stafford Loan interest rates.

If Congress doesn’t act on the interest rates by July, they will increase from 3.4 percent to 6.8 percent.

He appealed to younger voters in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, the home of the University of North Carolina, by slow-jamming the news. (Note that he dropped the mic at the end.)