Video showing sex act shown in Jones case

The cell phone video showed Jones ejaculating on the alleged victim, but did not show penetration.

Jake Grovum

In Hennepin County Court on Thursday, prosecutors showed a cell phone video depicting former Gophers football player Dominic Jones ejaculating on a woman’s face.

The alleged victim in Jones’ third-degree criminal sexual conduct case appeared unresponsive, with eyes closed, as Jones held her head up for a period of time while performing the sex act.

After showing the video, the prosecution displayed the video as still-frame images for evidence. The prosecution paused on certain still-frames, but continued through the whole video file, creating a slow-motion sequence of the act.

At least two of the frames showed Jones smiling, and during the video, rough audio was playing with distinct laughter coming from Jones and others in the room.

Still, the video didn’t show what the prosecution’s case relies on: penetration.

A third-degree criminal sexual conduct conviction would rely on the state proving Jones penetrated the woman without consent, according to Minnesota law.

Jones’ attorney, Earl Gray, will likely have to wait until the late stages of tomorrow’s hearing or next week until he can bring in witnesses. Gray didn’t aggressively cross-examine any of the prosecution’s witnesses Thursday, with the exception of University police Investigator Erin Schafer.

Gray pressed Schafer on why she didn’t mention the video to Jones during a police interview in late April last year – an interview Gray had earlier tried to get thrown out as evidence.

“Why didn’t you tell him that?” Gray asked. “Did you want to catch him up in some lies, is that it?”

Schafer said she was giving Jones the opportunity to come forward with the information and explain his side of the story.

Gray also singled out a discussion regarding the video between Schafer, the alleged victim and University police Investigator James Nystrom.

According to court documents discussed Thursday, Nystrom asked the alleged victim about the video during that interview.

The alleged victim initially replied, “Who’s going to see it?” Nystrom responded, “Hopefully nobody.”

Investigators hadn’t viewed the video before interviewing the alleged victim, according to Schafer’s testimony. Schafer said she wasn’t sure if anyone spoke with the woman after viewing it.

The prosecution will call former Gophers football player Robert McField on Friday morning. McField provided authorities with much of the information listed in the criminal complaint against Jones.

Prosecutors will also call Laquisha Malone, who brought the alleged victim to the University Village apartment where the incident allegedly occurred.

Jake Grovum is a senior staff reporter. Justin Horwath, on assignment for the Daily, contributed to this report.