Saira Blair becomes role model

Destanie Martin-Johnson

Saira Blair became the youngest candidate elected to state office in the nation on Nov. 4 at age 18. She won a seat in West Virginia’s House of Delegates and will represent a small part of the state. But instead of celebrating after her victory like many candidates, Blair had to get back to class at West Virginia University later that day.

A freshman in college while campaigning, Blair held signs right outside of her dorm room to gain popularity and recognition for who she is and what she stands for. As a young conservative, anti-abortion advocate and Second Amendment supporter, Blair is an inspiration to other young conservatives across the nation.

Young adults have been criticized with having apathy toward politics with a consistently low voter turnout rate. To me, it seems that the main reason many young people don’t vote in elections is that they feel their voices will not be heard or cared about.

Blair challenges this label. The fact that she was elected over a 44-year-old Democrat, capturing 63 percent of the vote, shows that she can still get her message heard, despite her age.

Some critics are skeptical of how effective she will be, considering her age and her second occupation as a student. Other critics suggest that her father is the reason for her success, as he is a state senator. Regardless of these criticisms, she still believes that she is her generation’s voice and that her fresh perspective will help provide solutions.

Blair had a simple idea that a young person in office would be beneficial. She then proceeded to campaign right outside her dorm room. Though it is very probable that her father’s political connections and money helped her succeed, she is still an inspiration to our generation. She is proof that young voices can be heard. One just needs the will, and the resources, to speak up and be heard.