Students feel finals stress once again

Paula Haynes

Computer science student Jackson Tomlinson bowed over a math book Monday afternoon in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Building.

“I don’t have time to deal with the stress,” Tomlinson said, looking up at the ceiling in a moment of contemplation.

The stress of classes, part-time jobs and other commitments are heightened for Tomlinson and many other students this week as the semester ends.

Tomlinson not only has 16 credits to worry about, he also works up to 30 hours a week at Target, takes care of his two young children and, on that day, was fighting the flu.

“I keep second guessing whether it’s really worth it to go to school,” Tomlinson said.

At the European Grind coffee shop Monday, nursing students studied around a table, but not for finals.

“If I were to start thinking about finals, I would fall on the floor and start crying,” senior nursing student Connie Hankins said.

Erik Freed, a Lind Hall tutor, said he typically does not see an increase in students seeking help until the Monday of most schools’ finals week.

He said most students are generally prepared, but there are some who “really don’t have much of a clue and expect you to teach them calculus in an hour.”

Freed said there was not much he, or any of the other tutors, could do for people who have not studied for their classes all semester.

“At this point, it’s too late to really start panicking,” physics senior Renae Conneran said.

Conneran was working on a three-page solution to an integral for her quantum mechanics class Monday. She said she often gets only six hours of sleep per night during finals and that working until midnight at Kohl’s department store makes getting more sleep difficult.

Some students use music and exercise to relieve their stress. Chris Baker, a second-year biomedical engineering graduate student, said he is currently in a band, and is working with an interpretive dancer on an art project.