Marcy-Holmes considers new residential development

Residents expressed concern the development, which will replace a single-family home, will make the neighborhood less family friendly.

A rendering of a proposed apartment building at 334 9th Street SE

Courtesy of Marcy-Holmes Neighborhood Association

A rendering of a proposed apartment building at 334 9th Street SE

Imani Cruzen

The Marcy-Holmes Neighborhood Association’s Land Use and Development Committee voted Tuesday to forward feedback to the developer for a proposed residential building.

The 15-unit, four-story Valerian LLC and DJR Architecture development called the 9th Street Flats is slated for 330 9th St. SE. in the Marcy-Holmes neighborhood. It would replace a one-story residential home, according to the project description.

Residents expressed concern the demolition of the home and construction of the new development, which would be one-bedroom units, would move the neighborhood away from its family-friendly atmosphere. Although the developer’s proposal includes the City of Minneapolis’ minimum number of required parking spots, residents also expressed concern about increased traffic congestion.

“They say they’re not going to block the road, but the parking is truly a serious issue,” said Tom Ray, a Marcy-Holmes resident. “The city is in ‘la la land’ about the parking.”

Marcy-Holmes resident Bill Huntzicker proposed putting off the development until there is further study of its effects on neighborhood parking and traffic. Huntzicker’s proposal prompted the neighborhood to vote to draft an instructional letter to Valerian with suggestions for this proposal and future developments.

Several residents said they plan to meet with Ward 3 City Council member Steve Fletcher to share their concerns.

Huntzicker said if there are affordable houses in the neighborhood, they should be saved to encourage families to stay in the neighborhood.

“Why not get a family in it?” he said. “If you have families growing up in the neighborhood, you can support schools and parks.”

Residents also expressed frustration they weren’t told about the house sale and proposed construction earlier.

The developers were seeking a letter of support, but received the instructional letter instead. The letter requests the City’s Planning Commission hearing be delayed in order to study the traffic and parking concerns brought up by residents. The letter would express residents’ desire to keep the single-family home that exists on the lot.

“You keep tearing down houses and putting this stuff up, pretty soon you’re not going to have a residential neighborhood,” Ray said. “You’re just going to have a neighborhood of people who don’t care because they are only going to be here a short time.”

Michael Margulies, project manager with Valerian LLC, said he sympathized with the concerns, but there is a huge demand for housing that justifies replacing the single-family home with higher-density housing.

“It’s an area that’s having a transition and change is tough,” said Dean Dovolis, a project manager with DJR Architecture. “It’s part of the idea of regenerating new families, new residents within the area.”