Jamba Juice to mix up Stadium Village

The smoothie shop will move into the space vacated by Harvard Market.

Kelly Gulbrandson

Stadium Village’s Harvard Market moved its location in May, but a new business will soon blend its way into the market’s former space.

Jodi Kirsch, a marketing representative with Diversified Construction of St. Louis Park said the company is putting a new Jamba Juice at the site.

The store is projected to open in mid- to late-December, she said.

“Jamba Juice is one of our clients and we have built a couple of other locations for them,” she said.

Stadium Village Commercial Association spokesman Jim Rosvold said Harvard Market’s owner was working to get another convenience store in the space, but couldn’t come to an agreement with the landlord.

Elio Montermini, the property’s manager, said he advised the property’s owner to take on Jamba Juice as a tenant. There were two other potential tenants – a coffee shop and a convenience store.

Montermini said Jamba Juice was the best choice for the location because it’s a reputable company.

“We expect them to be there for a long time,” he said.

Harvard Market’s owner, Brad Mateer, said though the rent was too high for his convenience store, he has mixed feelings about another corporation in the area.

“(Harvard Market) was the only original business left in Stadium Village,” he said. “When they closed it, they closed down 102 years’ worth of history.”

Rosvold said it surprised him that another Jamba Juice would be so close to the Coffman Union location.

He said he would have liked to see a convenience store stay but “it wasn’t in the cards” because the property owners rejected other convenience store offers.

Rosvold said while he’d rather see a different business go into the space, it’s better to have the building occupied than empty.

“We have lost a convenience store and a drug store a few years ago, so one of those would have been nice,” he said.

Stadium Village is a good place for independent businesses to thrive, but corporations also see it as a way to succeed, he said.

“I have been in the neighborhood for 17 years and have slowly watched it being taken over by franchises,” Rosvold said.

The problem with corporations in Stadium Village is the lack of cooperation with neighborhood business associations, he said. With independent businesses, Rosvold said there generally is a higher level of participation.

Nursing senior Becca Aronsen said she’d heard about the new Jamba Juice coming to campus. She said she goes to the one in Coffman, but only occasionally, because she lives in Dinkytown.

“I have classes in Moos Tower, so I’m sure I’d make it over there,” she said.