Daily Digest: technology, torture, tongue-in-cheek tweets

Katherine Lymn

President Obama is visiting Marquette, Mich. today to recognize and promote the city’s unusually extensive broadband access, the Detroit Freep reports. On the shores of the frigid Upper Peninsula, Obama will highlight how the city’s wireless network has benefited local businesses. Here in Minnesota, access to high-speed internet for everyone by 2015 is a main goal outlined in a December report, according to the Strib. Minnesota has been proactive in reaching this goal, compared to other states, but the state also has a larger gap in access between urban and rural areas. “You have to look at all of us, or we can’t judge ourselves as being a success,” said one broadband official.

Check out this account of a reporter’s time in captivity in the Mukhabarat, Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak’s “security apparatus.” Though the reporter, Robert Tait, was not surprised to be arrested, as has been happening to many foreign journalists. “Yet it was different,” he writes. “My experience, while highly personal, wasn’t really about me or the foreign media. It was about gaining an insight – if that is possible behind a blindfold – into the inner workings of the Mubarak regime. It told me all I needed to know about why it had become hated, feared and loathed by the mass of ordinary Egyptians.” By the way, this cable leads some to believe the FBI trained Egypt’s state torturers.

Perhaps the latest form of political satire, fake twitter accounts are popping up all over. Rahm Emanuel and Sarah Palin are two victims ­— if you want to call it that —of fans/opponents that create accounts in the names of celebrity politicians and bless us with tweets gems this one, from the very unofficial “RahmforMayor”:

“Only f-in conversation I recall with Blago is when he f-in creepily asked ‘What products do you use in your silky hair?’ Hippie Jeebies!”

In this alter-ego community, where Egypt’s Mubarak suggests the “Muslim Brotherhood of the Traveling Pants,” has led to lighthearted witch hunts to find who’s behind the anonymous accounts, the New York Times reports. “Casual conversations in newsrooms, at bars and even over Twitter are peppered with allusions to “fake Rahm Emanuel” and “DCJourno” as the city’s insiders laugh about the accounts and lament that they did not think of them first.