This week in music: Jeff Goldblum, Charles Bradley and more

Jeff Goldblum’s live jazz album and a posthumous Charles Bradley album.

Album covers for Jeff Goldblum & The Mildred Snitzer Orchestra's

Courtesy Photo

Album covers for Jeff Goldblum & The Mildred Snitzer Orchestra's "The Capitol Studios Sessions" and Charles Bradley's "Black Velvet"

Maddy Folstein

Jeff Goldblum and the Mildred Snitzer Orchestra “The Capitol Studios Sessions” 

Jeff Goldblum might be one of the most baffling recipients of recent Internet fame. He’s known for iconic roles in “Jurassic Park” and “Independence Day,” has over one million followers on Instagram and recently received his own “Hot Ones” episode on YouTube.

He also hosts a jazz show in Los Angeles with his band, The Mildred Snitzer Orchestra. The group released their debut album last Friday, full of the band’s live performances of jazz standards and peppered with Goldblum’s jokes and commentary.  

On “Me and My Shadow,” Goldblum riffs about leaving butter out on the counter overnight. He references “Jurassic Park” and flirts with the women (including comedian Sarah Silverman and former “American Idol” contestant Haley Reinhart) featured on the album. 

“The Capitol Studios Sessions” is strange and more than a little kitschy. The album is full of music that’s easy to play in the background, but something about Goldblum’s celebrity persona demands a little more attention. 

The Mildred Snitzer Orchestra cruises its way through the songs featured on the album — showy on tracks like “Caravan,” smooth on “It Never Entered My Mind.” Still, it’s easy to walk away a little confused. Is this something that warrants the memes Goldblum’s followers love, or does it serve as something more musically satisfying? 

We’re not quite sure.

Grade: B

Charles Bradley — “Black Velvet”

The release of “Black Velvet” came a few days after what would have been Charles Bradley’s 70th birthday. The album collects previously unreleased songs from Bradley’s recordings — a fitting celebration of the raspy-voiced singer’s career and life. 

From the first blare of the horns in the opening song, “Can’t Fight the Feeling,” Bradley fans will recognize the familiar grooves of his previous works. The tracks are rife with heartache and passion, emotions encapsulated in every growl and soar of Bradley’s voice. 

The album — collected by his friends and family — maintains the intimacy of Bradley’s songs throughout the collection. “(I Hope You Find) The Good Life” wavers beautifully between monologue and song. 

“Black Velvet” fills in the gaps of Bradley’s beloved music career. The final track, “Victim of Love (Electronic Version),” reimagines his original hit. The newly released version relies on a fuller band that still twinkles and soars under the rough emotion of Bradley’s voice. 

“Black Velvet” lets us revel in the talent of Charles Bradley a little longer.

Grade: A

Also new this week:

CupcakKe — “Eden”

Imagine Dragons — “Origins”

Lil Peep — “Come Over When You’re Sober, Pt. 2”

Muse — “Simulation Theory”