Basics of Tea

Dylan Hester

 

I stand by the philosophy that any time is a good time for a cup of tea, but this is especially true at the beginning of the Spring semester. Temperatures have fallen, workloads are building, and the stress of another semester is inevitable. If you need to take some time out, here are some basics of tea that may help.
 
Black teas, such as Earl Gray, Darjeeling, and Irish Breakfast, work somewhat analagously to coffee. They are strong, they  &undefined;&&undefined;undefined&undefined;&&undefined;&&undefined;undefined&undefined;undefined&&undefined;undefined&undefined;are flavorful, and work really well in the mornings. &undefined;&&undefined;undefined&undefined;&&undefined;&&undefined;undefined&undefined;undefined&&undefined;undefined&undefined;
 
The ever-popular green teas are often blended with other herbs, such as lemongrass. Green teas can be relaxing, but they do contain caffeine to keep you going throughout a particularly busy afternoon. They also tend to steep fairly quickly, and the leaves are often good for multiple brews.
 
Herbal teas are made without actual tea leaves, which means they are, by and large, caffeine-free. Chamomile is a common one, and for good reason. It has a calming effect which is ideal before bed. It is also a good choice to combat a stomach ache or other physical stress. Peppermint, on the other hand, is useful if you need an energy boost but don’t want to deal with any more caffeine. It helps activate the brain and produces increased focus.
 
These examples are just some basics of tea. There are many different kinds and uses, and there is no better time to start drinking tea than in cold weather like this.
 
Be sure to check the A&&undefined;&&undefined;undefined&undefined;&&undefined;&&undefined;undefined&undefined;undefined&&undefined;undefined&undefined;E Section of the Minnesota Daily on January &&undefined;&&undefined;undefined&undefined;undefined&&undefined;undefined&undefined;6 for a rundown on local coffeeshops that serve fresh, loose-leaf tea.
I stand by the philosophy that any time is a good time for a cup of tea, but this is especially true at the beginning of the Spring semester. Temperatures have fallen, workloads are building, and the stress of another semester is inevitable. If you need to take some time out, here are some basics of tea that may help.
 
Black teas, such as Earl Gray, Darjeeling, and Irish Breakfast, work somewhat analagously to coffee. They are strong, they  &undefined;&&undefined;undefined&undefined;&&undefined;&&undefined;undefined&undefined;undefined&&undefined;undefined&undefined;are flavorful, and work really well in the mornings. &undefined;&&undefined;undefined&undefined;&&undefined;&&undefined;undefined&undefined;undefined&&undefined;undefined&undefined;
 
The ever-popular green teas are often blended with other herbs, such as lemongrass. Green teas can be relaxing, but they do contain caffeine to keep you going throughout a particularly busy afternoon. They also tend to steep fairly quickly, and the leaves are often good for multiple brews.
 
Herbal teas are made without actual tea leaves, which means they are, by and large, caffeine-free. Chamomile is a common one, and for good reason. It has a calming effect which is ideal before bed. It is also a good choice to combat a stomach ache or other physical stress. Peppermint, on the other hand, is useful if you need an energy boost but don’t want to deal with any more caffeine. It helps activate the brain and produces increased focus.
 
These examples are just some basics of tea. There are many different kinds and uses, and there is no better time to start drinking tea than in cold weather like this.
 
Be sure to check the A&&undefined;&&undefined;undefined&undefined;&&undefined;&&undefined;undefined&undefined;undefined&&undefined;undefined&undefined;E Section of the Minnesota Daily on January &&undefined;&&undefined;undefined&undefined;undefined&&undefined;undefined&undefined;6 for a rundown on local coffeeshops that serve fresh, loose-leaf tea.
I stand by the philosophy that any time is a good time for a cup of tea, but this is especially true at the beginning of the Spring semester. Temperatures have fallen, workloads are building, and the stress of another semester is inevitable. If you need to take some time out, here are some basics of tea that may help.
 
Black teas, such as Earl Gray, Darjeeling, and Irish Breakfast, work somewhat analagously to coffee. They are strong, they are flavorful, and work really well in the mornings. The ever-popular green teas are often blended with other herbs, such as lemongrass. Green teas can be relaxing, but they do contain caffeine to keep you going throughout a particularly busy afternoon. They also tend to steep fairly quickly, and the leaves are often good for multiple brews.
 
Herbal teas are made without actual tea leaves, which means they are, by and large, caffeine-free. Chamomile is a common one, and for good reason. It has a calming effect which is ideal before bed. It is also a good choice to combat a stomach ache or other physical stress. Peppermint, on the other hand, is useful if you need an energy boost but don’t want to deal with any more caffeine. It helps activate the brain and produces increased focus.
 
These examples are just some basics of tea. There are many different kinds and uses, and there is no better time to start drinking tea than in cold weather like this. Be sure to check the A&E Section of the Minnesota Daily for a rundown on local coffeeshops that serve fresh, loose-leaf tea.