Brewster is new coach

Brewster last coached at the collegiate level at the University of Texas in 2001.

C.J. Spang

The University of Minnesota has a new man leading its football team.

Tim Brewster, who spent the last two seasons as the tight ends coach of the Denver Broncos, accepted an offer Tuesday to become the Gophers’ head coach, according to a news release sent by the University.

The official news conference announcing the decision will be held at 1 p.m. today at McNamara Alumni Center.

“Sometimes it’s a vibe you get with a guy. You feel that he’s the right guy to come in and lead your program where it needs to be,” said Bob Lichtenfels, a regional manager for the national recruiting Web site Scout.com.

“Sometimes that’s better than picking a guy who might have the name recognition. Fans won’t see it like that, but as an administrator you have to lay all your cards on the table and make the best decision for you and your program, for your budget and what you can afford.”

While the contract has not been drafted yet, the Daily has obtained a copy of the memorandum of understanding.

Brewster signed a five-year deal, effective Monday, with the option of a one or more year extension after a 36-month review. The extension will be at the University’s discretion.

The base salary is $400,000 per year with an annual review by athletic director Joel Maturi, at which time Maturi might increase the salary based on performance.

By comparison, former head coach Glen Mason’s base salary for 2006 was $450,000 and would have been $468,000 for 2007.

Brewster will also receive $400,000 of supplemental compensation in recognition of his efforts on behalf of the University for media, fundraising, community involvement, endorsements, apparel and shoes.

Also at Maturi’s discretion will be bonus compensation for achieving athletic and academic performance goals.

An additional sum of $200,000 will be contributed annually by the University to a deferred compensation plan that will vest five years after Brewster’s initial date of employment, if he remains employed as head coach.

Brewster will also receive full standard benefits, the same provided by the University to all professional employees, with contributions and benefit amounts based on the salary where relevant.

Other perks include reimbursement for his household moving expenses in accordance with University policy and state law, as well as the use of one vehicle, to be provided by the University.

There are other stipulations in the contract as well.

Brewster is prohibited from receiving any benefits or compensation, other than those described above, from any source without prior written agreement.

If Brewster terminates the contract, or the contract is terminated for cause, the University won’t be liable for any payments or benefits after the date of termination.

There will also be a provision that Brewster will agree not to seek or apply for other positions without prior notice and consent from the athletic director.

The deal with Minnesota is Brewster’s first job as head coach, but the two-time All-Big Ten Conference selection as a player at the University of Illinois, has coaching experience at both the professional and collegiate levels.

“Guys like that just need a shot. Somebody has to give them that shot eventually,” Lichtenfels said. “He’s learned from great guys. He’s learned a lot of different systems – to be a successful coach, any guy will tell you, you need to get as many systems under your belt as you can, learn from different guys on how they run their programs.”

Before joining the Broncos, Brewster was tight ends coach with the San Diego Chargers, from 2002-2004, and had a hand in the success of 2004 All-Pro tight end Antonio Gates.

His collegiate coaching experience began in 1986 as a graduate assistant at Purdue. In 1989, Brewster was special teams coach and recruiting coordinator at the University of North Carolina under current University of Texas coach Mack Brown.

In 1998, Brewster followed Brown to Texas and coached there until 2001. While at Texas, Brewster helped recruit Vince Young, who led the Longhorns to the 2005 national championship. Young was recently named the Associated Press NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year as quarterback of the Tennessee Titans.

“People put too much emphasis on the head coaching experience. Like I said, somebody eventually has to give you a shot,” Lichtenfels said. “Minnesota could come out looking like geniuses.”