Twin Cities undergrads can switch to S/N for fall and spring, provost announces

Courses taken pass/fail will also count toward all graduation and program requirements.

Abbey Machtig, Campus Administration Reporter

The University of Minnesota announced further changes to the current grading system for the fall and spring semesters in a systemwide email sent Wednesday.

The changes come in response to advocacy by the Minnesota Student Association, and will allow undergraduate students on the Twin Cities campus to switch to or from the pass/fail grading system for the fall semester through early January. These changes will also be available for spring semester.

Students intending to make these changes should email One Stop Student Services from Jan. 4 – Jan. 6, 2021.

Following feedback from students throughout the fall semester, the approved resolution makes it so courses taken S/N, or pass/fail will count toward all graduation and program requirements, given that students earn a qualifying grade, Vice President and Provost Rachel Croson said in the email.

The new changes also dictate that any courses taken S/N through the fall or spring semesters will not count towards the total number of S/N courses allowed to be taken within undergraduate programs.

Consistent with other grading changes made earlier this fall, any grades of “F” will automatically be changed to a grade of “N” instead. The circumstances of the fall and spring semesters will also be noted on undergraduate transcripts, according to the email.

Croson urged students to consider the effect of changing their course grading on future semesters. Students may visit the One Stop COVID-19 frequently asked questions page for more guidance.

“As this choice may affect longer-term outcomes (e.g., admission to post-baccalaureate education, employment) as well as current outcomes like financial aid and scholarship eligibility, eligibility for the Dean’s list, athletic eligibility, intra-college transfers, accreditation, licensure and certifications (among others), I strongly urge students to become informed about the consequences of their choices,” reads the email.

This is a breaking news report. More information may be added as it becomes available.